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Intergenerational Transmission of Breast Cancer Health Inequities

A funding opportunity to examine whether intergenerational transmission of breast cancer susceptibility can be influenced by environmental exposures.

This initiative aims to examine whether intergenerational transmission of breast cancer susceptibility can be influenced by environmental exposures (e.g. chemical exposures; multi-level exposures to social determinants of health). Studies will be viewed as responsive if they employ community-partnered participatory methods and are any of the following types of studies: epidemiology studies with stored biospecimens from earlier in life (e.g., prenatal period) and outcomes or strong intermediate markers in a least one subsequent generation (Approach 1); epidemiology studies that can utilize a mixed methods approach to analyze qualitative and quantitative data around intergenerational social determinants of health at the individual and community level (Approach 2); studies with access to one generation and breast cancer incidence outcomes in at least one subsequent generation (Approach 3).

CBCRP intends to fund up to three projects with a duration of three to five years maximum at a maximum total direct cost of $300,000 for Approach 1 and $425,000 for Approaches 2 or 3.

Download the RFP below:

Full Request for Proposals (RFP)

Application materials will be available through CBCRP's SmartSimple application and grant management system on December 1, 2022.

Applications must be submitted by 12:00 pm PT on Thursday, March 2, 2023. 

INFORMATIONAL WEBINARS

CBCRP offers online webinars for program-directed initiative funding opportunities. Join us for a description of the grant opportunity, and for engaging discussions on getting started and navigating the application materials. The webinars will be archived, but you are encouraged to sign up and participate in the live session.

We will be holding a webinar for potential applicants for this opportunity on Wednesday, December 14, 2022 at 02:00 pm PT.

Register here for the Applicant Webinar.

For questions or more information, contact CBCRP Program Officer Sharima Rasanayagam, Ph.D. at sharima.rasanayagam@ucop.edu.

Research Questions, Approaches and Methods 

This Initiative specifically focuses on studies that will provide evidence on whether intergenerational transmission of breast cancer susceptibility can be influenced by environmental exposures.  The definition of environment for this proposal includes environmental chemical exposures (ECEs) as well as macro and meso-social forces. For this funding opportunity, we are interested in at least two generations, with exposure taking place in one generation and outcomes in at least one subsequent generation. In addition, community-partnered participatory methods are required to gain contextual understanding of exposures to chemicals and to social factors. Proposals addressing specific environmental chemicals and/or broader social environment factors will be considered responsive for this RFP.  The following research topics should be considered:

  1. Is the unequal burden of breast cancer seen in BIPOC influenced by intergenerational transmission of risk through early life exposure to specific environmental chemicals? and/or
  2. Is the unequal burden of breast cancer incidence and/or mortality explained by persistent intergenerational macro and meso level social forces? Analysis of upstream causal factors include structural policies that contribute to systematic unequal access to resources (e.g. wealth, employment, education, housing, healthcare, etc.) and the built environment.

Studies will be viewed as responsive if they are conducted by a partnership on two co-PIs, one an experienced academically-trained researcher and the other a community leader from the impacted community and employ any of the following approaches:

  • Approach 1: epidemiology studies with stored biospecimens from earlier in life (e.g., prenatal period) and outcomes in a least one subsequent generation; outcomes may include breast cancer or strong intermediate markers like mammographic breast density; 
  • Approach 2: epidemiology studies that can utilize a mixed methods approach to analyze qualitative and quantitative data around intergenerational social determinants of health at the meso and macro level; or
  • Approach 3: studies with access to one generation and breast cancer incidence outcomes in at least one subsequent generation.

Projects responding to these aims will directly test whether we have undercounted breast cancer risk in communities comprised predominantly of BIPOC by a failure to measure intergenerational transmission of risk.

Project requirements

For each of these proposals we recommend that interdisciplinary teams be established with expertise in breast cancer epidemiology, social science and intergenerational modeling in collaboration with community stakeholders. For new data collection, we recommend community-partnered participatory research methods. For established cohorts, we recommend community participation for assisting in data gathering and interpretation and developing dissemination and communication strategies.

For each proposal, we are seeking investigators to collaborate with community members using community-partnered participatory research methods (CPPR) for the development of study questions and protocols including recruitment and retention, interpretation (including language) and dissemination of results. Proposals should outline the strategies that will be used to connect with the communities and attain access to multiple generations.

The project plan needs to include a dissemination plan and should discuss if the dissemination plan will be ongoing throughout the project or at the end and justify the frequency of the dissemination elements.  Each plan should specify who on the project will be part of the dissemination team, who will be the target audience including non-research audiences, especially community members, practitioners and policy makers. The dissemination plan requirements should take into account audiences, messages, channels, milestones, and appropriate resources to reach milestones.  Given the focus of this project on understanding the potentially large undercounting of risk based on intergenerational transmission, communication to both clinical and public health practitioners as well as policy makers is essential.

Project duration and budget cap

CBCRP intends to fund up to three Awards.

  • Maximum direct cost budget: $300,000 for Approach 1; $425,000 for Approaches 2 or 3
  • Project duration: 3 - 5 years